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Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping

Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping


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The need to keep goods cool often results in total shipping costs more expensive than the goods themselves

Rise of online chocolate sales is pushing companies to find more cost-effective solutions.

High shipping costs can put a bitter taste in anyone’s mouth, and with the rise of online shopping, chocolate companies are increasingly pushed to find ways to keep costs down in shipping goods directly to consumers.

For example, Hershey’s charges $6.95 to ship a $4.25 bag of its Kisses when consumers order directly from the website. It also ‘strongly suggests’ customers buy liquid ice packs and a foam cooler for an additional $4.99, bringing the total to $20.20 before taxes with the recommended expedited shipping, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Vosges Haut-Chocolat, a high-end chocolate specialty chain, says it loses money on most cold shipments to consumers. E-commerce orders, however, are growing faster than boutique sales, and so the company charges $10 on orders to cover costs and is working with different combinations of gel packs and dry ice to further reduce costs.

“The biggest hurdle is… maintaining that balance of what the customer is willing to pay for, and how to ship it to them in the best condition possible,” said Zach Jarosz, Vosges’s supply-chain planning manager.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.


Chocolate Companies Struggling for Cost-Efficient Shipping - Recipes

The story of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates began with a need. In 1936, Gertrude Hawk needed money. Her family was struggling financially during the Great Depression. Her husband&rsquos job as a car salesman was not enough. Facing this need, Gertrude turned to a skill she possessed: chocolate making and dipping. She had learned the craft of chocolate at a local shop when she was a teenager. Gertrude left school after her father died when she was twelve and was helped to support her family then as a chocolate dipper. At two moments in her life&mdashas a teenage girl and as a middle-aged woman&mdashGertrude answered the needs of her family by going to work. This moment in 1936 when Gertrude Hawk used the best skills she had and started a business in her kitchen would shape her life, her community, and her family&rsquos for generations.

One of Gertrude&rsquos first customers was a local church that also needed funds. Partnering with churches, schools, and other non-profit organizations to fundraise became one of the hallmarks of Gertrude&rsquos kitchen-based business (of chocolate covered goodness).

Pictured right: The kitchen of Gertrude Hawk Chocolates on Mark Avenue in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

GENERATIONS OF GOODNESS

From 1936-1945 Gertrude continued to make chocolates in her kitchen. When Gertrude&rsquos son Elmer returned from serving in World War II he also had a need: to work. Like many members of his generation, Elmer Hawk was driven and not afraid of hard work. One of the things he wanted was to own his own business. He took business classes at a local college funded by the GI bill and realized the answer to his career-path dilemma was right in front of him: his mother&rsquos chocolate business. Gertrude and Elmer formed a partnership and she taught him about the craft of chocolate making.

Pictured left: Elmer, Gertrude and their son Elmer.

Maybe because I liked eating chocolate. It&rsquos a fun business.
Very rarely do you meet someone who doesn&rsquot enjoy chocolate.



Comments:

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  5. Aethelstan

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