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Princeton Review's Top Party Schools

Princeton Review's Top Party Schools


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Which schools got the world's booziest award?

Photo Reminders of New Year's Eve... Modified: Flickr/Grace Smith/CC 4.0

Princeton released the party schools list that everyone loves (or dreads).

It's the award that makes college admissions worry, kids revel, and parents nervous: Princeton Review has listed its top party schools for 2013, with West Virginia University taking the top award.

WVU has been in the top 20 party schools 12 times in the past 21 years, reports the LA Times. One possible reason for its ranking is the large number of alcohol-related citations during the most receent move-in weekend this month. Coming up second and third were the University of Iowa and Ohio University, respectively.

Of course, it's not to say that the most celebrated ranking of Princeton Review's The Best 377 Colleges is all that accurate. WVU spokesman Becky Lofstead said in a statement to the Associated Press, "If you look at the schools on this list, they are mostly large, public universities with strong academic and research profiles, as well as highly successful athletic programs /// But in the big picture, clearly this list has no real credibility." But with the newest studies showing a strong correlation between happiness and binge-drinking in college students, perhaps it should be something to worry about.

You can find the full list at Princeton Review.

(Photo Reminders of New Year's Eve... Modified: Flickr/Grace Smith/CC 4.0)


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at


Playboy’s Top Party Schools

Claim: Playboy magazine compiles annual rankings of America’s top party schools.

MIXTURE OF TRUE AND FALSE INFORMATION:

Origins: Since the 1950s, rumors have been aired at every college in the U.S. that Playboy conducted surveys of drinking on college campuses and used them to compile annual lists of “America’s best party schools” (rumors usually spread by students proudly proclaiming that their own school had achieved the

in the latest ranking). However, not until the late 1980s did Playboy actually publish a ranking of this nature, and it was never an annual feature of the magazine.

Through the end of 2006, such a list had appeared in the pages of Playboy only three times: in its January 1987, November 2002, and May 2006 issues. However, there were two precursors to the full-blown list: the September 1968 issue identified the University of Wisconsin at Madison as the most permissive campus (drawn from a sample of and dubbed it “the party school” (primarily because it served beer in the student union) likewise the October 1976 issue named UCLA tops in “campus action.”

In more recent years Playboy has sometimes republished college rankings compiled by others, such as the annual list of The Top 20 Party Schools as determined by The Princeton Review.

Prior to 2002, Playboy had compiled their own list of “party schools” only once. They gave their reason for reprising this feature in 2002 as:

The information for Playboy‘s 1987 list of party schools had been compiled in 1986 from the reports of Playboy staffers who interviewed campus club leaders, dorm rush chairmen, fraternity presidents and other campus social studs at more than nationwide. Which leads us straight into the legend which has sprung up around this famed list:

Gentle souls that they are, Playboy referenced this bit of folklore (a charming bit of blarney which been told about any number of schools, cheese-enhanced and otherwise, for many years prior to 1987) and did their best console those who were left off the January 1987 compilation by stating, “If your school isn’t listed, it’s probably because we didn’t include professionals.”

For those who really want to know how their institutions of higher learning fare now in the “party school” category, Princeton Review’s latest eagerly-awaited annual ranking of the party schools was issued as follows in August 2014, based on a survey of 130,000 students at



Comments:

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