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Summer Berries Clafoutis

Summer Berries Clafoutis


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This recipe, also referred to as Clafouti aux Petits Fruits is an easy, delicious, traditional French dessert made at the height of summer, "berry season." Clafoutis are traditionally a dessert, but they make an ideal Summer Brunch compliment as well.

Notes

Note: This clafouti recipe goes well with almond ice cream.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 Cup flour
  • 1/2 Cup granulated sugar
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 1/2 Teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 Cup milk
  • 1/2 Cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 Cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 Pound summer berries of your choice

Servings12

Calories Per Serving176

Folate equivalent (total)13µg3%


How to Make Clafoutis, With (Almost) Any Kind of Fruit

Custard lovers and pie lovers alike: Clafoutis is the dessert you need in your life. The name may sound fancy (it's French, after all), but it’s actually one of the easiest, most forgiving desserts I know. It's got oozy baked fruit like youɽ find in a pie, and the creamy eggy jiggle of a custard. But it's easier than both pie and custard. And best of all, it’s adaptable: You can bake it in any kind of heatproof vessel with almost any kind of fruit you want.

I make a lot of clafoutis every summer. I make it because I love it, but also because it doesn't require any special equipment, so when I'm away at someone else's house for the weekend, or at a vacation rental with a poorly equipped kitchen, I can still whip together a good dessert with whatever fruit is available. Here's how to make clafoutis all summer long:


The Easy French Dessert That Works With Every Summer Fruit

I'm all for serving fresh fruit completely unadorned—especially super-flavorful, at-its-peak fruit—but sometimes, I want something a little jazzier. And a little carbier. For those moments, I turn to one of the easiest summer fruit desserts I know: clafouti.

The Trick That Will Make Your Blueberry Muffins Famous

A classic French country dessert, clafouti is made by pouring a sweet batter, similar to pancake batter, over fresh fruit. The eggy batter then bakes around the fruit, creating a light, airy, pudding-like texture—the perfect mix of airy and custardy. It's typically made with cherries, but plums, peaches, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries can all get the clafouti treatment (and, in the autumn, even sautéed apples and pears).

It's one of the easiest desserts around. And, because the recipe only calls for a small amount of flour, one of the easiest to make gluten free simply swap in an equal amount of brown rice flour. You can also flavor the batter in a variety of ways add in cocoa powder for a chocolate version or use buttermilk for a nice tang.

The only possible pitfall: Sometimes, clafouti comes out tough and chewy pastry. To avoid that, rest the batter for at least 30 minutes or, ideally, overnight. This lets the protein in the flour chill out and relax. Don't worry—you get to relax when the clafouti is baked.

While the batter rests, prepare the pan and fruit. Traditionally, the pan is buttered and floured, but I like to butter and sugar it, creating a pretty, crystal-like appearance (and nice crunch!) on the outer shell. Clafouti can be baked in any sort of baking dish or pan—fluted baking dishes are classic, but in a pinch a cast iron or even non-stick skillet will do just fine.

A note about the French: They use cherries, and they leave them whole. But you? You can totally pit yours.


Both clafoutis and flognarde are French cobblers that are made by placing fruit in a baking dish, topping the fruit with batter, and baking until the batter has set and turned golden. The texture is a cross between a custard and a classic American cobbler, and it’s quite a bit less sweet than the American version.

BUT– there is a difference between the two. What is it?

Clafoutis is made with sweet cherries, and only sweet cherries. When you swap the cherries for other fruit, you’ve technically got a flognarde.

And so, that means that technically we’re making a flognarde– but you go right ahead and call it a clafoutis if you prefer.


Cobblers, Crisps, and Clafoutis, Oh My!

As the summer heaves its last gasp (you have until mid-September, silly!) you’re likely facing a lot of changes. They might involve work or school, staying home or starting a commute. Regardless, you deserve a treat. The best sweets around lurk right around the bend at the farmer’s market. The peaches and pluots, late-summer berries and nectarines are startlingly good this year. Here’s what we’re craving. And don’t fret: Not a one of these involves making a dough or using a rolling pin. Because it’s still summer, technically don’t sweat a thing.

We have three marvelous cherry clafoutis recipes on the site, hearkening to the original cherry clafoutis from the Limousin region of France. We’re particularly partial to this version, which gets the tiniest bit of a bite and heat from fresh ginger. Clafoutis is all about that slightly custard-y base, and this one is thickened with buckwheat and regular flour and sweetened with vanilla. It’s ready in well under an hour, to boot.

So you want something biscuit-y and something fruity but don’t want to bother with fussiness of any stripe, including a floury mess. You want a cobbler. Perhaps this raspberry-plum number, which is just sweet enough and features plenty of vanilla (all the better to make the whole house smell good!) The whole thing materializes in about an hour, you drop the dough in clumps onto the fruit topping, and you have time for a whole TV show while it cooks. Ahhh.

Perhaps even easier than clafoutis or a cobbler is the beloved crisp. You can very nearly mix oats, sugar and cinnamon with a pinch of salt in a bowl while feeding the baby/ stirring something on the stove/ organizing a google doc for work. This knockout pear-bourbon skillet crisp bears out that theory. You’ve got bourbon, pears, sugar, flour and cinnamon hanging out in a bowl for half an hour while you forget about them. When you remember you’ve got it marinating, turn on the oven, mix up that super-simple crisp topping, and everyone, into the pool! (Er, the oven.) Bonus: Your home will smell amazing.

We’ll admit that we’re a little obsessed with this apricot clafoutis. (So are home cooks! Five stars.) It really involves just three steps: 1) Quarter apricots and sprinkle with brandy. 2) Blend together a fast batter. 3) Pop in oven. So easy, so good, and boy, does it look tasty in a cast-iron skillet with ice cream lazily melting on top.

We’ve got a cool quintet of apple crisp recipes in addition to this mighty autumnal apple-cranberry crisp, so don’t fret if you’re not a cranberry fan. You can absolutely make the crisp topping in a mini-prep food processor, and the rest comes together as easily as a swimmer doing the backstroke on a hazy September day. Remember that apple crisp in the oven makes a home smell like a New England cider house in October.

Three-Berry Cobbler

Breakfast? Lunch? Dinner? Brunch? Any time can be three-berry cobbler time. Just change the topping to suit your mood or needs. We’ve been known to serve this beauty with vanilla ice cream or crème fraîche, Greek yogurt or whipped cream. Or on its own, on a porch, overlooking the lawn. There’s something about little velvety berries all commingling, with tapioca for an unctuous texture and a good splash of buttermilk to keep it from being top-heavy. It says, “spring,” it says, “summer,” and it says “You deserve this.” (And you do.)


Recipe: French clafoutis, filled with summer fruits, couldn’t be simpler to make

Summer Fruit Clafoutis Sheryl Julian

The French baked custard with fruit, called clafoutis (cla-foo-TEE), is as easy as a dessert gets. You whir similar ingredients to pancakes -- eggs, milk, flour, and sugar -- and pour the batter over fruits in a baking dish. The original clafoutis comes from Limousin in south-central France, where cherries (unpitted) went into the dish. Unless you stop by a farmhouse in the Limousin region, you won't find it made that way. Clafoutis can be baked with a variety of fruits, such as apples, pears, and plums. Here, the bottom of the dish is filled with raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, cut-up peaches, and quartered figs. We use more fruit than a typical clafoutis so it's hard to cut the dessert into wedges. But you get all those beautiful summer tastes surrounded by an eggy custard (some cooks compare it to flan). To prepare the clafoutis in advance, make the batter and refrigerate it overnight is fine. Spread the fruits in a well-buttered dish and refrigerate them too. When it's time to bake, let both come to room temp and pour the batter into the dish. Clafoutis puffs nicely in the oven and deflates immediately (as quickly as a souffle). Nothing you can do about that. Just sprinkle it with confectioners' sugar and serve it with a big spoon. It's juicy and custardy and a very welcome summer dessert.

Butter (for the dish)
3 eggs
cups whole milk
1teaspoon vanilla extract
Grated rind of 1 lemon
½cup granulated sugar
¾cup flour
¼teaspoon baking powder
½teaspoon salt
3cups mixed summer fruits (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, cut-up peaches, quartered figs)
Confectioners' sugar (for sprinkling)

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Generously butter a deep 10-inch baking dish (2-quart capacity).

2. In a blender, combine the eggs, milk, vanilla, lemon rind, and sugar. Work until the mixture is smooth. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt. Work again until the mixture is smooth.

3. Spread the berries in the baking dish. Pour the egg mixture on top. Transfer to the oven.

4. Bake the mixture for 40 to 45 minutes, or until it is set and golden and puffed.

5. Sprinkle with confectioners' sugar (the clafoutis deflates quickly) and serve with a large spoon.

The French baked custard with fruit, called clafoutis (cla-foo-TEE), is as easy as a dessert gets. You whir similar ingredients to pancakes -- eggs, milk, flour, and sugar -- and pour the batter over fruits in a baking dish. The original clafoutis comes from Limousin in south-central France, where cherries (unpitted) went into the dish. Unless you stop by a farmhouse in the Limousin region, you won't find it made that way. Clafoutis can be baked with a variety of fruits, such as apples, pears, and plums. Here, the bottom of the dish is filled with raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, cut-up peaches, and quartered figs. We use more fruit than a typical clafoutis so it's hard to cut the dessert into wedges. But you get all those beautiful summer tastes surrounded by an eggy custard (some cooks compare it to flan). To prepare the clafoutis in advance, make the batter and refrigerate it overnight is fine. Spread the fruits in a well-buttered dish and refrigerate them too. When it's time to bake, let both come to room temp and pour the batter into the dish. Clafoutis puffs nicely in the oven and deflates immediately (as quickly as a souffle). Nothing you can do about that. Just sprinkle it with confectioners' sugar and serve it with a big spoon. It's juicy and custardy and a very welcome summer dessert.

Butter (for the dish)
3 eggs
cups whole milk
1teaspoon vanilla extract
Grated rind of 1 lemon
½cup granulated sugar
¾cup flour
¼teaspoon baking powder
½teaspoon salt
3cups mixed summer fruits (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, cut-up peaches, quartered figs)
Confectioners' sugar (for sprinkling)

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Generously butter a deep 10-inch baking dish (2-quart capacity).

2. In a blender, combine the eggs, milk, vanilla, lemon rind, and sugar. Work until the mixture is smooth. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt. Work again until the mixture is smooth.

3. Spread the berries in the baking dish. Pour the egg mixture on top. Transfer to the oven.

4. Bake the mixture for 40 to 45 minutes, or until it is set and golden and puffed.

5. Sprinkle with confectioners' sugar (the clafoutis deflates quickly) and serve with a large spoon. Sheryl Julian


Summer Berry Clafoutis

We asked the BT1 community to submit their favorite breakfast recipes, so we could share them for others to enjoy. This recipe for Summer Berry Clafoutis was submitted by Elizabeth Arnold.

We’ve all likely heard the expression that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” While that exact theory is a topic for debate, when it comes to diabetes management an argument can definitely be made for that statement. If you start your day with a sugary food option (donut, cereal, etc.) your blood sugar will likely have an initial spike, followed by an inevitable crash. Or it just remains high and you’re spending the rest of the morning correcting highs and/or lows. It definitely seems that what you have for breakfast can really set the tone for you blood sugar management for the day.

Of course we know with T1D there aren’t any “off limits” foods, but if you can have delicious breakfast options that are easy to make, won’t cause big blood sugar spikes (then crashes), are better for you and tastes great, that’s a win, win, win, win, right?!

This Summer Berry Clafoutis certainly fits all of those bills and is the perfect summer breakfast dish! Fresh berries make for a great summer clafoutis, but this recipe has endless variations for any time of the year: lemon blueberry, apple cinnamon, peaches and cream, strawberry rhubarb, raspberry almond, pear and cardamom, cranberry orange, etc. It truly is a seasonal recipe that can be adapted to almost any fruit, spice, or flavoring of your choice.

  • 4 eggs
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream or half and half
  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Butter (for greasing the baking dish)
  • 1 cup fresh mixed berries (blueberries, raspberries, strawberries & blackberries)
  1. Preheat oven to 350° degrees.
  2. Combine eggs, cream, almond flour, honey and vanilla in a blender and blend until smooth (alternatively, combine in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth).
  3. Pour batter into 8″ or 9″ greased baking dish. Add berries one by one so they are scattered throughout the dish.
  4. Bake for 25-30 minutes until golden and puffy.

Makes 8 servings
Per serving: 166 calories, 13 g total fat, 9 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 5 g protein


This beloved family recipe comes from Lazarus Lynch's book Son of a Southern Chef. A little cinnamon and nutmeg enhances the peach cobbler's filling.

The berry cobbler recipe gains complexity from a jumble of different berries and extra depth from dark brown sugar. Mixing the brown sugar with regular granulated sugar makes it easier to sprinkle on top of the biscuit topping before the cobbler goes into the oven when it comes out, the tender, featherlight biscuits will be crowned by golden crunch.

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Preheat an oven to 350 F. Butter a 9x9 inch square baking dish or a 9-inch deep-dish pie round with the softened butter. Set the pan aside

Spray a rimmed baking sheet with cooking oil and arrange the prepared raspberries in a single layer. Place the berries in the preheated oven and roast them for 15 to 20 minutes, until they are tender and slightly shrunken. Allow them to cool on the tray for 5 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, cream, flour, eggs, sugar, vanilla extract, and salt until it forms a smooth, thin batter. Spread 3/4 cup of the batter onto the bottom of the prepared baking dish and bake it for 2 to 4 minutes. Watch the batter closely and remove it before it cooks through completely. It should just start to thicken and set when it is removed from the oven.

Transfer the dish to a heatproof surface and arrange the raspberries over the hot batter. Pour the remaining batter over the raspberries and bake for 35 to 40 minutes, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Sprinkle the confectioners’ sugar over the finished raspberry clafouti and serve it warm.


Recipe

Summer Fruit Clafoutis
Makes 8 servings

Ingredients

  • Softened unsalted butter and sugar (for the ramekins)
  • ½ cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 pinches salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 cups fresh fruit, such as berries or sliced stone fruit
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • ¼ cup chopped pistachios, optional

Directions

  1. Place a rack in center of oven and preheat to 350 F. Lightly butter and sugar eight ramekins.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk the flour, sugar and salt together. Add the eggs, yolks, cream and lemon zest and continue to whisk until smooth. Slowly whisk in the melted butter.
  3. Divide the batter evenly among the ramekins, evenly scatter the fruit over the top of the batter, and sprinkle with turbinado sugar and pistachios.
  4. Place the ramekins on a baking sheet and bake until puffed, set in the center and light golden brown, about 15 to 20 minutes. (Note: You can alternate ramekins with a 9-inch cast-iron pan or cake pan and bake for 30 minutes.)
  5. Serve warm, with ice cream if desired.

Want to master seasonal desserts and more? Click here for more information on ICE’s Pastry & Baking Arts program.



Comments:

  1. Montrelle

    I think you are wrong.

  2. Fell

    Strongly disagree with the previous phrase



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